Bond robots add tech to old school methods for handwritten greetings

Bond robots add tech to old school methods for handwritten greetings

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With the modern technology of computers, email, instant messaging and electronic greeting cards, handwritten letters are virtually obsolete (minus the odd birthday and Christmas card). However a company called Bond has combined old school with new technology for sending ‘handwritten’ greetings.

[Image Source: Bond]

The company use robots in an innovative way. You can use your computer or your mobile phone to send a greeting or a note and the robot then writes out your message in calligraphy on paper or using your own handwriting style that it stores in memory. The message is then put in an envelope and sealed with wax and sent to you.

[Image Source: Bond]

To make use of the handwriting Bond robots the company requires that you send them a handwriting sample of your own if you want the robot to use your writing style; or you can choose one of the standard calligraphy styles from the website. This allows you to send out a greeting or note with a personal touch while at the same time not having to sit down and actually write out the greeting yourself. It’s especially good if you want to send out a lot of different greetings or invites that are personalised for each person (as you won’t have to write out each one). All you have to do is type it using the computer keyboard or the keyboard on the smartphone.

[Image Source: Bond]

While the service could be used for a one off special occasion it would be perfect for newlyweds who have lots of correspondence to reply to, such as sending out personalised thank you notes for wedding presents. To store your own handwriting there is a setup fee of $199 and following this you can send messages or cards for $2.99 or even less if you are making a larger bulk order.

It’s a pretty steep price but if you’re handwriting isn’t all that presentable and you want custom personalised greetings then you may want to just let the Bond robots do their thing